Nylon Defined : Learn more about Nylon

Nylon Prices

Nylons are one of the most common polymers used as a fiber.  Another name for this material is polyamide, due to the characteristic amide groups in the backbone chain. Nylon 6 is made from caprolactam and nylon 6,6 is made from Adipic acid.  About 24% of nylon 6 is used in engineering resins and the rest in nylon fibres.

Nylon 6 fibres are made into textile, carpet and industrial yarns.
 
Nylon is a generic designation for a family of synthetic polymers known generically as polyamides, first produced on February 28, 1935, by Wallace Carothers at DuPont's research facility at the DuPont Experimental Station. Nylon is one of the most commonly used polymers.

Nylon is a thermoplastic silky material, first used commercially in a nylon-bristled toothbrush (1938), followed more famously by women's stockings ("nylons"; 1940). It is made of repeating units linked by amide bonds and is frequently referred to as polyamide (PA). Nylon was the first commercially successful synthetic polymer. There are two common methods of making nylon for fiber applications. In one approach, molecules with an acid (COOH) group on each end are reacted with molecules containing amine (NH2) groups on each end. The resulting nylon is named on the basis of the number of carbon atoms separating the two acid groups and the two amines. These are formed into monomers of intermediate molecular weight, which are then reacted to form long polymer chains.

Nylon was intended to be a synthetic replacement for silk and substituted for it in many different products after silk became scarce during World War II. It replaced silk in military applications such as parachutes and flak vests, and was used in many types of vehicle tires.

Nylon fibres are used in many applications, including fabrics, bridal veils, carpets, musical strings, and rope.

Solid nylon is used for mechanical parts such as machine screws, gears and other low- to medium-stress components previously cast in metal. Engineering-grade nylon is processed by extrusion, casting, and injection molding. Solid nylon is used in hair combs. Type 6,6 Nylon 101 is the most common commercial grade of nylon, and Nylon 6 is the most common commercial grade of molded nylon. Nylon is available in glass-filled variants which increase structural and impact strength and rigidity, and molybdenum sulfide-filled variants which increase lubricity.

Aramids are another type of polyamide with quite different chain structures which include aromatic groups in the main chain. Such polymers make excellent ballistic fibres.

Characteristics

  • Variation of luster: nylon has the ability to be very lustrous, semilustrous or dull.
  • Durability: its high tenacity fibers are used for seatbelts, tire cords, ballistic cloth and other uses.
  • High elongation
  • Excellent abrasion resistance
  • Highly resilient (nylon fabrics are heat-set)
  • Paved the way for easy-care garments
  • High resistance to insects, fungi, animals, as well as molds, mildew, rot and many chemicals
  • Used in carpets and nylon stockings
  • Melts instead of burning
  • Used in many military applications
  • Good specific strength

Historical uses

Bill Pittendreigh, DuPont, and other individuals and corporations worked diligently during the first few months of World War II to find a way to replace Asian silk and hemp with nylon in parachutes. It was also used to make tires, tents, ropes, ponchos, and other military supplies. It was even used in the production of a high-grade paper for U.S. currency. At the outset of the war, cotton accounted for more than 80% of all fibers used and manufactured, and wool fibers accounted for the remaining 20%. By August 1945, manufactured fibers had taken a market share of 25% and cotton had dropped.

Learn more about synthetic polymers and polyamides on Wikipedia.

The above definition of nylon has been obtained from the Wikipedia website on June 14, 2011.  The Nylon Prices website (Apparel Search Company) has modified the definition.  If you wish to view the most current and non-modified version, please visit http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nylon.

Below is some more educational information regarding Nylon.

Nylons are one of the most common polymers used as a fibre.  Another name for this material is polyamide, due to the characteristic amide groups in the backbone chain. Nylon 6 is made from caprolactam and nylon 6,6 is made from Adipic acid.  About 24% of nylon 6 is used in engineering resins and the rest in nylon fibres.

Nylon 6 fibres are made into textile, carpet and industrial yarns. Nylon 6,6 (Nylon 6/6) is a general purpose extruded grade of nylon that is tough, has good electrical insulating properties and noise dampening characteristics. Nylon resins are noted for their performance properties including high tensile strength, excellent abrasion, chemical and heat resistance, and low coefficient of friction. Hence they are used in engineering plastics with applications in the automotive industry, electronics and industrial components and films for food packaging, as well as fabric, carpeting, sportswear and recreational equipment.

Nylon 6/6 was the first nylon material available in rod, sheet and tube form for industrial application. Nylon 6/6 is a superior performer. Of all the unmodified nylons, it has the highest melting point, is the strongest, and the most rigid. Nylon 6/6 is an excellent replacement for a wide range of different materials ranging from metals to rubber beacuse of its toughness, and combination of low coefficient of friction and good abrasion resistance.  This product also has outstanding resistance to alkalies and organic materials, as well as good electrical insulating characteristics and noise damping properties.  Standard metal working equipment is suitable in the fabrication of precision parts. The combination of machinability, excellent properties, and performance have made Nylon 6/6 the most widely used nylon in American industry.

Nylon 6/12 possesses similar properties to that of Nylon 6/6, however, Nylon 6/12 has a higher temperature rating and lower water absorption.

Nylon Prices
Nylon Yarn Prices
Nylon Fabric Prices
Nylon Resin Prices
Textile Industry Pricing Sites

If you are an educator or business person with educational information regarding textiles such as nylon, please let us know if you have definitions or data to share.

Return to the Nylon Prices main page.

 

About Us  Contact Us

copyright © 2013 Fabric Search / Nylon Fabric